Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018

Reed

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 09:29 AM

Senator Reed: (8:54 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "The American people are watching this debate with serious, real-world concerns about what a Justice Kavanaugh would mean for them. They're worried they could wake up to news that a conservative 5-4 majority on the court has stripped them of their health insurance, abolished their right to privacy and control over their reproductive health or revoked their right to marry whomever they choose. A Supreme Court that continues to overturn laws that were enacted to prevent corporations and wealthy individuals from using their money to rig the political system. It is abundantly clear given Judge Kavanaugh's selection by special interest groups and the mad rush to confirm him at all costs that powerful interests are counting on him to further these trends, which point a future where political power is directly tied to wealth and status." 

Murray, Peters, Baldwin

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 10:11 AM

Senator Murray: (9:28 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "And I believe it is simply wrong to rush to a finish on this confirmation based on that alone Madam President, I also believe that what we saw of Judge Kavanaugh's temperament in the hearing last week, his bitter partisanship, his rage, his disrespect was absolutely disqualifying as well and will undermine the Supreme Court and erode trust in the decisions that they make. I believe the lack of credibility and honesty he demonstrated in his hearings which I and my colleagues have spoken about here at great length is absolutely disqualifying as well. And this isn't just me saying this. We are hearing an unprecedented outcry on this particular point from lawyers and judges and former clerks and the religious community and even Supreme Court Justice Stevens."

 

Senator Peters: (9:40 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "I hope they are right, but I seriously doubt it. I think that if confirmed, Judge Kavanaugh will spearhead the continued erosion of rights for American women and if given the chance, will vote to overturn this settled precedent. Lots of talk in Washington about the Supreme Court centers on precedent or power or procedure. But, Madam President, I would argue voting for a Supreme Court nominee is fundamentally about people. In making a decision on how I will vote on a Supreme Court nominee, I ask two questions. First, how will the nominee serve the people of Michigan and, second, how will the nominee serve the nation as a whole."

 

Senator Baldwin: (10:00 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "At a time when so many in Washington are working to overturn the law of the land that helps provide affordable health care to 133 million Americans with preexisting conditions, including more than two million Wisconsinites, we cannot afford a nominee who would serve as the deciding vote to take us back to the days when powerful insurance companies wrote the rules. The president vowed to appoint judges to the Supreme Court who would overturn the law of the land Roe v. Wade. And I take him at his word. Judge Kavanaugh is his choice for a lifetime appointment that would turn back the clock on a woman's constitutional right and freedom to make her own health care choices."

Fischer, Markey, Shaheen

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 11:39 AM

Senator Fischer: (10:32 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Moreover, I was impressed by his commitment to the rule of law. He understands the proper role of a judge as an interpreter, not the writer of the law. He also understands that unlike members of Congress or the executive branch who are accountable to the people, the judiciary must act independently and follow the law wherever it takes them. This was something we heard repeatedly from him in his lengthy confirmation hearing before the senate judiciary committee. Judge Kavanaugh demonstrated his strong commitment to judicial independence. During the hearing he repeatedly affirmed that, quote, what makes a good judge is independence, not being swayed by political or public pressure."

 

Senator Markey: (10:57 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Madam President, I rise to speak in opposition to the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to serve as an associate justice on the United States Supreme Court. The vacancy that Judge Kavanaugh seeks to fill is not an ordinary one. The retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy created one of the most consequential vacancies on the high court that this country has ever seen. There is a reason why scholars and pundits refer to the supreme court of the last 30 years as the Kennedy court. His influence on so many important cases cannot be overstated. Throughout his three decades on the supreme court, Justice Kennedy was often the swing vote in decisions decided 5-4 on a divided bench."

 

Senator Shaheen: (11:26 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "As the highest court in the land, the justices on the Supreme Court are tasked with the enormous responsibility of interpreting and protecting the fundamental constitutional rights that are guaranteed to all Americans. Its decisions are not abstract legal principles that are reserved for a few. Its decisions affect the rights of all of us. They touch on issues that affect all of our daily lives from the health care we receive to the person we can marry to the air that we breathe. These are significant stakes that we face when considering any nomination to serve on the Supreme Court. Now, weeks ago I announced my opposition to Judge Kavanaugh's nomination based on concerns that I had with his record. And even though, as Senator Markey pointed out so eloquently, we haven't gotten to see a lot of that record."

Brown, Sullivan, Van Hollen

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 01:50 PM

Senator Brown: (11:43 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "I don't think my colleagues understand the process of collective process. I am working bipartisanly with a number of my colleagues on a pension bill. I don't know that my colleagues understand when it comes to pension, they sit down at the bargaining table and give up wages today to have secure retirements. I'm concerned about this Supreme Court's view on bargaining rights and fair pay and fair benefits. I'm concerned about this court in terms of protecting American workers and American consumers from discrimination and, shall we say, Wall Street greed. I'm troubled already by the Supreme Court's recent decisions stripping rights from Ohioans on many issues."

 

Senator Sullivan: (12:28 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Mr. President, like so many of us here, I've been watching and listening to my colleagues speak on the floor about the judge Kavanaugh nomination for several days. And like so many of my colleagues, I want to commend senator Collins of Maine for her thorough, detailed, and eloquent remarks yesterday. Sometimes a member gives a speech that we know will always be remembered because of its thoroughness, its seriousness, statesman-like quality. I think we all are in agreement that that happened yesterday with senator Collins. I also want to highlight my very good friend, senator murkowski's remarks last night."

 

Senator Van Hollen: (1:01 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "It's an important check on executive power. We are invested with this special responsibility to ensure that individuals nominated by the president to be Supreme Court justices will be people who make decisions fairly and impartially without favor and without bias. That is why lady justice wears a blind followed and holds a balanced - blindfold and holds a balanced scale on which to way the claims that come before her. The integrity of the Supreme Court requires that every person - every person who comes before that court can have confidence that each justice will fairly weigh the evidence and the arguments."

Hirono, Leahy, Casey, Cornyn

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 02:38 PM

Senator Hirono: (1:32 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "And I feel extremely grateful for them and for the overwhelming amount of support that I have received and continue to receive during this extremely difficult and painful time. There may be people with power who are looking the other way but there are millions more who are standing together speaking up about personal experiences of sexual violence and taking action to support survivors. This is truly a collective moment of survivors and allies standing together. Thank you for hearing me, seeing me, and believing me. I am grateful for each and every one of you."

 

Senator Leahy: (1:48 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "And in shaping the legal justifications for some of the Bush administration's most extreme and eventually discredited policies. I've never seen a nominee so casually willing to evade and deny the truth in service of his own raw ambition. For decades that ambition has led him step after step to evade the truth if it's in any way going to stop his ambitions. And the truth is we're just beginning to learn about Judge Kavanaugh's dishonesty under oath. His testimony during his 2004 and 2006 hearing only came to light as the Judiciary Committee obtained some of his white house e-mails."

 

Senator Casey: (2:06 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "This administration and congressional Republicans have been trying for the better part of the last two years to rip away health care coverage from the people who need it the most across America. Republicans in both branches of government, the executive branch and the legislative branch have attempted to decimate Medicaid, and although they've been unable so far to fully repeal the Affordable Care Act here in Congress, the Republicans have turned to the courts to sabotage the health care system and the Affordable Care Act."

 

Senator Cornyn: (2:22 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Mr. President, in a few moments, we will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court. It is time. Justice Gorsuch and justice Sotomayor were confirmed 66 days after they were nominated. Today marks the 90th day since President Trump nominated Judge Kavanaugh, so this is in line with the time frame for previous justices. What is different, though, about this nomination is the manifest unfairness in the way it was conducted and in the tone of some senators as well as the special interest groups that support them."

Durbin, Grassley, Schumer, McConnell

Executive Session (Kavanaugh Nomination)

Oct 06 2018 03:44 PM

Senator Durbin: (2:37 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "It was our request after we heard complaints of Dr. Ford and allegations that there be a thorough investigation on the Democratic side we asked for that repeatedly from the Republican majority. It wasn't until Senator Flake and some of his Republican colleagues made a point of saying they wouldn't move to go forward with this hearing without an F.B.I. investigation that it finally was agreed to. Let me also add that statements have been made publicly by the public spokesman at the White House about how the witnesses were chosen for this F.B.I. investigation, according to Mr. Shaw, who works in the White House, he told us that a list of witnesses was sent by Senate Republicans to the White House and they were included in their request."

 

Senator Grassley: (2:51 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Mr. President, I come one final time in support of Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation to serve as associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. Democratic leaders did everything in their power to make Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation about anything except his judicial record and his outstanding academic qualifications. The Democratic leader has promised to oppose Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation from day one and use every play in the book to accomplish that goal even though the Senate had access to more of Judge Kavanaugh's records than we have had for any other Supreme Court nominee, Democratic leaders tried to bury the Judiciary Committee in mountains of irrelevant paperwork."

 

Senator Schumer: (3:24 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Truly, Judge Kavanaugh's confirmation is a low moment for the Senate, for the court, for the country. The Republican majority has conducted one of the least transparent, least fair, most biased processes in senate history, slanting the table from the very beginning to produce their desired result. Why do I say this? Because they withheld over 90% of the nominee's record from the senate and the American people, because they refused to allow Dr. Ford to call a single corroborating witness at the hearing, including the only other eyewitness to the incident, because they refused to have an independent investigation of the facts before the hearing in order to inform the questioning, because they hired an outside prosecutor to question Dr. Ford as if she were on trial."

 

Senator McConnell: (3:34 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "The constitution of the United States was made not merely for the generation that then existed, but for posterity. Those are the words of Henry clay. Mr. President, Kentucky's own. They underscore that the decision United States senators will make today will echo in the history of our nation. The very survival of our constitutional form of government requires an expert and independent judiciary. Without fair and impartial courts of justice, as Alexander Hamilton put it in the "Federalist Papers," all the reservations of particular rights or privileges would amount to nothing. The courts guard our rights, and the senate guards our courts."

Wrap Up (The Senate Stands Adjourned), Coons

Wrap Up

Oct 06 2018 04:43 PM

Tuesday, October 9 -

  • The Senate will convene at 3:00 p.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will resume consideration of the House message accompanying S. 3021, the vehicle for WRDA.
  • At 5:30 p.m., the Senate will VOTE on cloture on the motion to concur in the House amendments to S. 3021, the vehicle for WRDA.
  • Note: on Saturday, October 6, cloture was filed on the motion to concur in the House amendments to S. 3021, the vehicle for WRDA.
  • Note: on Saturday, October 6, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #640, Jeffrey Bossert Clark, of Virginia, to be an Assistant Attorney General.
  • Note: on Saturday, October 6, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #641, Eric S. Dreiband, of Maryland, to be an Assistant Attorney General.
  • Note: on Saturday, October 6, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #866, James N. Stewart, of North Carolina, to be an Assistant Secretary of Defense.

 

Senator Coons: (4:25 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "I asked judge Kavanaugh about a comment he made on a panel at Georgetown when he said, quote, if the president were the sole subject of a criminal investigation, I would say no one should be investigating that. In fact, Judge Kavanaugh testified he didn't say that. But I've reviewed the record. I followed up with a series of questions for the record to get additional information I think the American people should know and to give Judge Kavanaugh a chance outside of our brief exchanges in the confirmation process to explain his suggestions that perhaps I had misquoted him, and, unfortunately, instead I received pages of nonanswers."