Reed, Tillis (UC), Schatz, Wyden

Executive Session (Pompeo Nomination)

Senator Reed: (5:48 p.m.)

  • Spoke on Russian election interference.
    • "It is easier for those who wish to circumvent the laws protecting our democratic system to do so from behind a corporate mask. Thus, when the Supreme Court gave corporations the right to make unlimited independent expenditures in elections, it also opened the door for those who wished to hide their election spending to cover their cracks of shell companies and other entities that only exist on paper. Our nation historically has sought to safeguard our system of government from foreign influence. The Constitution requires the president to be a natural-born citizen. Early lobbying disclosure reforms were crafted with the threat of foreign propaganda in mind. And it remains a federal crime for a foreign national directly or indirectly to spend money to influence our elections."

 

Senator Tillis: (6:02 p.m)

  • Unanimous Consent –
    • That notwithstanding the provisions of Rule XXII, at 12:00 p.m. tomorrow there be four minutes of debate equally divided and the Senate then VOTE on cloture on Executive Calendar #788, Mike Pompeo, of Kansas, to be Secretary of State.
    • If cloture is invoked, all time be considered expired and the Senate VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #788, Mike Pompeo, of Kansas, to be Secretary of State.
    • Further, following disposition of the Pompeo nomination, the Senate then resume consideration of the Grenell nomination with the time until 1:45 p.m. equally divided in the usual form and at 1:45 p.m. the Senate VOTE on cloture on Executive Calendar #619, Richard Grenell, of California, to be Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.
    • Finally, if cloture is invoked on the Grenell nomination, all time be considered expired and the Senate then VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #619, Richard Grenell, of California, to be Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.
    • (Without Objection)

 

Senator Schatz: (6:03 p.m.)

  • Spoke on climate change.
    • "I was pleased with President Macron's speech today. There was so much that he reminded us that we had in common, not just between America and France, but between Democrats and Republicans. As he reminded us of our great history together, as he reminded us of our cultural exchange, as he reminded us of our military cooperation, he also reminded us that our great democracies believe in science. We have to believe in science. We have to believe in expertise. And it is absolutely appropriate, I'm looking at the presiding officer, we do not share the same political philosophy, but we have to share the same set of facts. And that's what's so damaging about a so-called think tank like heartland."

 

Senator Wyden: (6:19 p.m.)

  • Spoke on dark money in politics.
    • "Otherwise, if you're a typical American putting in on hard day's work, supporting your family, you just probably have a sense that the campaign finance laws are rigged for the big and the powerful. Now, there was an era when running for office was as simple as putting your name out for the public. You'd go and get a few local civic groups in your concern. You'd bring in a few modest donations to get your campaign off the ground. Certainly it's not that way anymore. It has now been well chronicled how a wave of money, particularly from a few secretive, powerful individuals like the Koch brothers have flooded American politics in the last few decades."