Senator Bond and Missouri Farm Bureau’s Kruse Call on Ag Farmers & Families to Keep Up Pressure to Cut Gas Prices

October 7, 2008


            JEFFERSON CITY, MO – U.S. Senator Kit Bond today joined Missouri Farm Bureau President Charles Kruse to outline a comprehensive energy strategy to help ease the burden of high gas prices on Missouri farmers, families and workers.
 
            “High gas prices are a tax on family budgets.” said Bond. “For farmers, truckers, teachers, rural citizens commuting to work, or parents driving kids to school, the high price of gasoline is increasing costs, eroding paychecks and eating into pocketbooks.”
 
Kruse said Missouri Farm Bureau policy has long-supported enactment of a comprehensive national energy policy.  “We can’t afford even more delays and irrational arguments against the common sense use of our nation’s energy resources,” said Kruse.  “We appreciate the leadership of Senator Bond working to make energy policy a major priority of Congress.”
 
            During today’s meeting at the Farm Bureau Office in Jefferson City, Bond and Kruse stressed that Missouri families and farmers are suffering from a gas-price crisis.  For farmers, costs to run trucks and tractors and get their goods to market are higher than ever before.  Farm inputs such as fertilizer costs are two to three times higher because of energy inflation. Because trucks haul 70 percent of all freight, rising fuel costs have increased the cost of nearly everything, for everyone – from major airlines and automakers who are laying off thousands of workers to parents driving their kids to school.  With the widespread pain at the pump, it’s no wonder that the high price of fuel is the number one concern for all Americans, Bond pointed out.
 
Bond and Kruse urged Missourians to send a message to Congress that the American people want action now – whether it’s signing the Missouri Farm Bureau petition calling for Congress to act, writing a letter, or making a phone call, Americans must make their voices heard. Bond and Kruse urged Congress to pass a comprehensive energy solution, which includes new offshore drilling, nuclear power, clean coal, wind power, hybrid vehicles, renewable fuels, solar power, plug-in technologies, hydrogen power and oil shale in the West and Arctic Circle.  Bipartisan and comprehensive action on energy will send a resounding positive message to the troubled financial markets around the world that American energy, and the jobs that come with it, are on the way, said Bond.
 
Bond and Kruse called for continued pressure on Congress to lower gas prices following inaction by Congress, which allowed the historic ban on new offshore drilling to expire before recessing for the November elections.  The ban, also called a moratorium, prevented America from tapping 18 billion barrels of oil off U.S. shores.  Bond noted that while new offshore exploration off our Atlantic and Pacific shores can now begin, pressure must be maintained to prevent a new President from reversing the decision to tap U.S. reserves and reduce gas prices.