Tuesday, Jul. 17, 2018

Senator Whitehouse: (7:34 p.m.)

  • Spoke on judicial nominations.
    • "It would be the chance where you could stand up against wealth, where you could stand up against power, and even if they controlled the legislature, even if they controlled the governor, you still had your shot before that jury of your peers and in those courts. So that's the context for looking at these judges who are being put forward by a special interest apparatus of perhaps unprecedented power in our country's history, certainly unprecedented power in our country's history since Teddy Roosevelt broke the back of the big trusts and the big business interests that had dominated in his era. Here we have these two characters coming through. One is Mr. Bounds."

 

Senator Warren: (7:58 p.m.)

  • Spoke on judicial nominations.
    • "I want to thank Senator Merkley for bringing us here this evening to give us this chance to talk about a Supreme Court nominee and to have us all here to talk about a whole range of issues, because this Supreme Court nominee will affect the lives of every single human being. So thank you very much, Senator Merkley, for doing this. Mr. President, since day one, the Trump administration has been plagued with chaos, corruption, and broken promises. Candidate Trump promised to drain the swamp in Washington, but this administration is teaming with shady, corrupt, political appointees."

 

Senator Wyden: (8:14 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Ryan Bounds to be a U.S. Circuit Court Judge for the Ninth Circuit.
    • "As I indicated, I believe that the debate about Ryan Bounds is not a typical debate on a typical nomination for reasons I'm going to outline tonight. And in my view, it is vital that the Senate look at this nomination in a broader context, particularly as it relates to what I call the decline of principled bipartisanship here in the Senate. And I want to be clear about what I mean when I mention the word "principled bipartisanship." And the reason I describe it that way. Bipartisanship born of principle. Bipartisanship is not about taking each other's bad ideas."

Sanders, Rubio, Merkley, Blumenthal

Morning Business

Jul 17 2018

Senator Sanders: (6:23 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "Today we face an unprecedented situation of a president who, for whatever reason, refuses to acknowledge an attack on American democracy. Either he really doesn't understand what has happened or he is under Russian influence because of compromising information they may have on him or because he is ultimately more sympathetic to Russia's authoritarian oligarchic form of society than he is to American democracy. Whatever the reason, Congress must act and must act now to demand that the president of the United States represent the interest of the American people and not Russia."

 

Senator Rubio: (6:40 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "He also grew up in a society where neighbors spied on each other and kids turned their parents in and you never really knew who the other person you were talking to was. But if you were reported as someone who was against the government, your career, your ability to go to school, and the quality of life for your family would be deeply impacted. There's no way you grew up in a society like that and an environment like that and then later on go and work as a spy and it's not somehow framed the way you operate or think for years to come. The other thing that's pretty clear for reasons I don't fully understand because I don't know him, I don't know his family, I don't know his upbringing, but he takes everything deeply personal."

 

Senator Merkley: (7:07 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Ryan Bounds to be a U.S. Circuit Court Judge for the Ninth Circuit.
    • "His nomination has already strained and degraded the Senate's blue slip tradition as our colleagues rush to pack our colleagues with extremist judges to advance that division, not of judges who call balls and strikes but of judicial activists who want to rewrite the Constitution, rewrite it to put down workers, to put down health care rights, to lay out and tear down consumer rights, women's rights, so many opportunities and empowerments diminished in the favor of the privileged and the powerful. That's what's going on with the packing of the court, and this deed - this deed of putting forward this nomination on this floor tonight changes 100-year tradition of comity in the U.S. Senate and a recognition that the home state senators have something to say important about the integrity of the individual being put forward."

 

Senator Blumenthal: (7:20 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Ryan Bounds to be a U.S. Circuit Court Judge for the Ninth Circuit.
    • "We debated this issue in the Judiciary Committee as a time-honored tradition that senators be consulted, that they return a blue slip - that is approval of a nominee - from their states. And that is because senators like Senator Merkley and Senator Wyden are rooted in those states. They know the lawyers. Many of us are lawyers. They know the colleagues of people who may be nominated to the United States district court or the court of appeals in the jurisdiction that covers the areas that they serve. They know the lawyers who have appeared before these judges, their qualifications, and sometimes their faults. And they know also the opinions professionally of these lawyers."

Whitehouse, Hirono, Smith, Graham

Executive Session (Oldham Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Whitehouse: (5:30 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "And the way in which Mr. Kavanaugh comes to this nomination smells of all of that influence already. For starters, he was selected through a very private process that from all the information we have into it is moderated by a group called the Federalist Society but which checks in with all the big Republican funding special interests to make sure that they are all okay with the nominee. There is a preclearance by special interests that takes place for these judicial nominees. And obviously the most powerful and wealthy special interests, the biggest political force perhaps ever, is going to be a part of that checklist. There can be no doubt that if the fossil fuel industry wasn't checked off on Brett Kavanaugh he would not be the nominee."

 

Senator Hirono: (5:44 p.m.)

  • Spoke on judicial nominations.
    • "Cases making their way through the court include California v. E.P.A. which challenges California environmental regulations on vehicle emissions. Another case, West Virginia v. E.P.A., which challenges Obama's clean power plan. These cases raise crucial questions that would determine whether the government has the power to protect our environment. The answers to those questions may very welcome from the Supreme Court. The president's nominee to the Supreme Court Brett Kavanaugh raises serious concerns about whether he would be that fair arbiter on environmental issues on these kinds of cases that will surely come before the Supreme Court."

 

Senator Smith: (5:56 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "Judge Kavanaugh has demonstrated that he simply doesn't believe that existing law allows new environmental threats to be addressed by any sort of regulation. I'm talking about existing law designed to protect human health and our environment. When you take a look at Judge Kavanaugh's record, one thing becomes abundantly clear. Judge Kavanaugh has tried to weaken Clean Air Act protections, even though the act controls pollutants like smog and carbon dioxide which contribute to asthma, heart attacks, and even premature death. They put our health at risk. Judge Kavanaugh offered an opinion which found that the E.P.A. had exceeded its authority when the agency directed upwind states to literally stop blowing smoke onto their downwind neighbors."

 

Senator Graham: (6:03 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "The bottom line here is that we all owe it to every voter in the country and all those who are serving in the intelligence community and the military to secure our election the best we can. So I'm hoping that we'll become team America just for a few minutes. I'm not asking my Democrat friends to give President Trump a pass. I'm not asking my Republican colleagues to stop fighting for our agenda. I'm asking both parties to calm downing and focus on the common enemy. The common enemy is Russia and countries like Russia that want to undermine our democracy, pit us one against the other, and they did it in 2016. And if you believe Dan coats, they're going to do it again."

Van Hollen, Murray, Portman, Carper

Executive Session (Oldham Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Van Hollen: (4:43 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "But, Mr. President, until now, until this moment in our history, the principles and values that I outlined have been the guideposts and cornerstones for American presidents, Republicans and Democrats alike, since the end of World War II. And with those guideposts, we have built some very important international architecture, our alliances, international institutions or international agreements. But today, sadly, we have a president who has gone absolutely rogue on the time-tested bipartisan tenets of American foreign policy, whether it's the way he attacks or berates our allies or consistently goes out of his way to praise dictators like Vladimir Putin or Kim Jong un or other autocrats around the world."

 

Senator Murray: (4:54 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "Many Republican members of Congress are acting if they just have a Twitter feed, as if they aren't the party in control of the Senate and House, as if they don't have the ability to make a difference and demand change. That is absurd. The time for hand wringing and hoping the problem goes away is over. With the power to call up legislation and hold hearings, Republican leaders do have options, and they certainly have a lot of Democrats who stand ready and willing to help. Because, Mr. President, it is truly horrifying and deeply alarming that President Trump failed to use that moment to push President Putin to end his attacks on our country and our elections, and failed to condemn the Kremlin's interference in the election of our allies."

 

Senator Portman: (4:58 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "I was pleased to see President Trump's clarification today, the Russians did metal in our election, that's the consensus not just of the intelligence community but it's the consensus here among our own intelligence committee House and Senate led by Republicans. I will say that Congress has pushed pretty hard against some of the Russian visitor not just the meddling but the illegal annexation of Crimea, Russia's support of the Assad regime which has caused pain and agony. We have passed historic sanctions here on Russia. Should we look at additional sanctions? I'm hopeful to that. We've also provided for the first time ever lethal weapons to the Ukrainians to be able to push back on the eastern border of Ukraine. I pleaded with the Obama administration to provide such weapons, and they never did."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "And indeed he is. I now sits on the D.C. Circuit, the second most powerful court in the land. He has gotten positive reviews. Important to me is not just someone's qualifications and their legal background but also their character. Character is incredibly important for a Supreme Court that's going to have to deal with so many issues, important issues to us and our families going forward. This guy is someone of deep and strong character. He's compassionate, he has the humility to be able to listen, he's got a big heart. I have known this fight for over 15 years. He served in the second Bush administration. I also served there, got to know him and his wife there, and before that as well, during the campaigns. This is somebody who is, to me, not just a legal scholar and a judge but a friend."

 

Senator Carper: (5:06 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "There is no question. That's what they've done. But our president chose to ignore that and instead of admiring and speaking to the work of the intelligence agencies and concurring with them yesterday he decided to side with an authoritarian thug Vladimir Putin. That's a defining moment in our nation's history. I think it is a sad moment in our nation's history."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "I am going to go to page 2 here today with respect to Brett Kavanaugh. I voted for him. There were about a dozen Democrats in 2006 that voted for cloture. Four of us voted for - Robert Byrd, Mary Landrieu, I think Ben Nelson and I voted for confirmation. We voted, if you will, our hopes rather than our fears. But we voted in part because of what we learned from others who knew him, who worked with him and who admired him. I'll just flat out, if I had known then what I know now about the kind of decisions he would write and support over the next -- the following 12 years, I would not have voted for him in 2006."

Reed, Flake, Blumenthal

Executive Session (Oldham Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Reed: (4:25 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "That was confirmed unanimously by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Last Friday the Justice Department indicted 12 Russian military intelligence officers on charges of large-scale cyber operations to interfere with the 2016 press - 2016 presidential election. Despite being briefed on these developments, President Trump chose to decide with Putin on election interference. It's unconscionable that an American president standing on foreign soil chose to play Putin's press secretary rather than take the word of his own intelligence officials, career professionals who put their lives on the line for the safety and security of all Americans."

 

Senator Flake: (4:32 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "And I hope more of my Republican colleagues will speak about the spectacle yesterday in Helsinki. I said yesterday that I never thought that I would see a president of the United States stand with the president of Russia and blame the United States for Russian aggression. I said yesterday that that was shameful. I feel the same today. Today the president said that the press conference had been misinterpreted by the fake news media. I would say to the president that we all watched the press conference, and it wasn't the fake news media that sided with the Russian president over our own intelligence agencies. It was you."

 

Senator Blumenthal: (4:33 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "Those blinking lights, based on objective and unvarnished evidence, as he put it, of a pervasive continuing attack should bring us together as a legislative body and as a country. So this issue really is not about Donald Trump, as much as it is about our nation. The summit in a sense realized our worst fears, indeed our deepest nightmare. At best it was going to be a gift to President Putin because it legitimized him and elevated him on the world stage. Even if no words followed that private meeting. The truth is, as it happened, the president of the United States was a puppet, a Patsy, a pushover."

Kaine, Durbin, Menendez

Executive Session (Oldham Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Kaine: (3:55 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "Mr. President, I rise to follow my leader and talk about this issue of great importance, and let me just begin with something I cherish. I have a photo taken on December 1, 2016, of one of my children in snowy fields in Lithuania in a U.S. military operation with NATO troops called Operation Iron Sword and the photo is of him taking the oath of office to become a captain in the United States Marine Corps. He was deployed with 1,200 members of his battalion on the border of Russia between the Black and the Baltic Sea to protect America against a nation that General Joe Dunford, the head of our Joint Chiefs of Staff describe as our principal adversary."

 

Senator Durbin: (4:04 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "He made similar comments in damage control event going as far as to say, NATO allies were thrilled, in the words of President Trump, with his recent visit, a visit where he bullied and belittled them. At some moments the president loses touch with reality. He believes that we can't remember what happened yesterday or last week. We remember and the reason we remember is that such a dramatic departure from the conduct of previous presidents and it is such a dramatic departure from the history of the United States. I think our president's sense of history reaches back to the day before yesterday and not far beyond. He did not realize as President Reagan said so often that our NATO alliance is critical to the security of the United States and to our European friends and to the world. He just doesn't get it."

 

Senator Menendez: (4:14 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "The president said, and I quote, quote, I have great confidence in my intelligence people, but I'll tell you that President Putin was extremely strong and powerful in his denial today and what he did is an incredible offer. He offered to have the people working on the case come and work with their investigators with respect to the 12 military intelligence officers that the special counsel indicted. I think that's an incredible offer. Well, the only incredible thing about that offer is that the president of the United States would invite the perpetrator of the crime to help with the investigation. That's incredible. Every time President Trump failed to stand up to Vladimir Putin felt like a collective punch in the gut of the American people. It was disturbing and saddening to see the leader of the free world shrink in the face of a dictator."

Grassley, Thune, Schumer

Executive Session (Oldham Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Grassley: (3:20 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "One attack that I've seen on judge Kavanaugh is that he represents a threat to the Affordable Care Act's protection of people with preexisting conditions, so I want to tell you why numerically that just doesn't work out. Because the same five justices who upheld the constitutionality of the Affordable care act, and did it twice, are still on the court. Justice Kennedy, who Judge Kavanaugh would replace, voted to strike down the Affordable Care act. In other words, even assuming you could predict Judge Kavanaugh's vote one year from now or ten years from now on the Affordable Care Act, his vote would not change the outcome. Moreover, as Judge Kavanaugh had two opportunities to strike down the Affordable Care Act on the D.C. Circuit where he now serves, he did not do it."

 

Senator Thune: (3:37 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
    • "That's right, Mr. President. In the lead-up to Justice Gorsuch's confirmation the head of one liberal organization stated that there was, and I quote, that there is substantial evidence that if Gorsuch's egregious views were to become laws, Americans lives would be put at risk in untold ways, end quote. I'm happy to report that after Justice Gorsuch's tenure on the Supreme Court, Americans seeped to be - seem to be okay. Fast forward to Judge Kavanaugh's nomination, and once again Democrats have predicting that the sky will fall in a Republican Supreme Court nominee is confirmed. But faced with an imminently well-qualified mainstream nominee, they've been forced to resort to distortions or outright conspiracy theories to make their case."

 

Senator Schumer: (3:47 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "First, allow me to comment on what we just heard from the president just a few minutes ago President Trump seemed to say he accepts the findings of the intelligence community that Russia meddled in our election. Well, welcome to the club, President Trump. We've known since the middle of the 2016 election that they've meddled. For the president to admit it now is cold comfort to a disturbed public who watched him bend over backwards to avoid criticizing Putin directly. President Trump may be trying to squirm away from what he said yesterday, but it is 24 hours too late and in the wrong place for the president to take a real stance on Putin's election meddling."

Brown, Cortez Masto, Crapo

Executive Session (Quarles Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Brown: (2:15 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Randall Quarles to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.
    • "Time and again Mr. Quarles has sided with Wall Street, not with workers. Look what happened with the stress test. The Fed allowed the seven largest banks to redirect $96 billion that should be used to pay workers, to reduce fees for consumers, to protect taxpayers from bailouts. Instead, they plow that money into share buybacks, in dividend that reward, you guessed it, wealthy executives and investors. Two banks had capital below the amount. Now the fed will have new rules to make stress tests easier, giving banks more leeway to design the exams they will much more likely pass."

 

Senator Cortez Masto: (2:18 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Randall Quarles to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.
    • "I rise to speak out against the nomination of Randal Quarles. Mr. Quarles served in the Bush administration's Treasury Department in the years that led up to the financial crisis of 2008, his failure to take action to prevent this crisis led to hundreds of thousands of foreclosures and evictions in my home state of Nevada. Nevada was ground zero for the financial crisis, we were the hardest hit of any state in the country, we had the highest foreclosure rate for 62 months straight and the highest number of underwater mortgages. Banks took the homes of more than 219,000 Nevada families. Anyone driving through parts of Las Vegas and Reno in 2009 to see boarded up houses, for sale signs an empty lots everywhere."

 

Senator Crapo: (2:21 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Randall Quarles to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.
    • "In additions to his current service on the board, his government experience includes serving in multiple top posts in the Treasury Department. Currently only three of the seven available board seats are filled and several other nominees to the board await confirmation. I have appreciated the important work carried out by Mr. Quarles at the board. Including his role as regulatory and supervisory policy. Some argue he is responsible for the housing crisis. He wasn't on the federal board when the housing crisis occurred."

Hatch, Murray, Alexander

Executive Session (Blew Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Hatch: (11:32 a.m.)

  • Spoke on tariffs.
    • "I've been steadfast in working with the president with President Trump on our shared economic agenda, especially passage of the most important piece of tax reform legislation in a generation. Tax reform has already providing significant relief to families and businesses, large and small. Businesses across the country are now more globally competitive and are investing in their workforce, their workforce through wage hike, bonuses and increased 401(k) Contributions that are benefiting American workers, their families, and their communities. But this roaring economy that we worked together to build for American workers and businesses is at risk because of the president's trade policies. Tariffs against our allies and partners in Europe, Canada, Mexico, and around the world are already harming American farmers and manufacturers and raising costs for American families."

 

Senator Murray: (11:37 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of James Blew to be an Assistant Secretary of Education.
    • "And despite an unprecedented tie-breaking vote by Vice President Pence, Secretary Devos has ignored the public's overwhelming rejection to her extreme ideology and instead she continues to promote her privatization agenda, trying to shift taxpayer funds away from our public schools. She's ignoring key parts of our nation's k-12 law by refusing to hold states accountable for the success of our most vulnerable students. She's making it easier for predatory for-profit colleges and corporations to take advantage of students, rolling back protections for students, and dismantling the unit that investigates claims of fraud and abuse."

 

Senator Alexander: (11:42 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of James Blew to be an Assistant Secretary of Education.
    • "He is well-qualified to lead that office. Four years in various roles he's advocated for improving educational opportunities by overseeing grants to low-low-income, high-risk schedules. He has an M.B.A. from Yale University. He will be in charge of helping managing the department of management and budget. Mr. Blew's sin according to colleagues on the other side is that he is in favor of public charter schools, which give teachers more freedom to teach and parents more freedom to choose a school for their child. No one should be surprised that a Republican president would nominate such an assistant secretary of education."

Durbin, Schumer, Cornyn

Executive Session (Blew Nomination)

Jul 17 2018

Senator Durbin: (10:20 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "President Obama was looking for a bipartisan response condemning Putin's efforts in the closing days of the election so as to avoid any hint of partisanship in the public announcement and to present a unified deterrent. What was the response of majority leader Mitch McConnell after hearing this alarming revelation? That Vladimir Putin was actively interfering in our elections and trying to undermine our democracy? Senator McConnell's response - no thanks, we're not going to help. Incredibly, neither the senator for his party did. Madam President, is there anyone in the Senate, anyone who took the oath to protect our nation against enemies foreign and domestic who thinks any of us, regardless of political party, should receive help from a foreign adversary to get elected?"

 

Senator Schumer: (10:45 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "He and Putin seem to be speaking from the same script as the president made a conscience choice to defend a tyrant against the fair questions of a free press and to grant Putin, an uncontested platform to spew propaganda and lies to the world. Coming close on the heels of President Trump's bombastic and erratic conduct towards our closest friends and allies in Brussels and Britain, today's press conference - yesterday's press conference actually, marks a recent low point in the history of the American presidency. Not only did President Trump fail to speak the truth about an adversary, but speaking for America to the world, our president failed to defend all that makes us who we are, a republic, free people dedicated to liberty at home and abroad. Americans must be champions of that cause if it's to succeed. Americans are waiting and hoping for President Trump to embrace that sacred responsibility. "

 

Senator Cornyn: (11:03 a.m.)

  • Spoke on the meeting between President Trump and President Putin.
    • "And as a matter of fact this afternoon, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is hearing from some Obama administration officials on why they didn't do more to stop it back when President Obama was in office when they knew very clearly what was going on but did not do -- well, virtually did nothing to stop it. So I would say to my friend from New York, the Democratic leader, there have been a lot of hearings and the hearings are ongoing, and obviously Special Counsel Mueller has issued this indictment. I only wish that it was more than a name and shame exercise because there is no chance the Russians will extradite these intelligence officers over here for a trial, but I think it does serve a useful educational purpose by pointing out in minute detail what the Russians have been up to. "
  • Spoke on the abolition of I.C.E.
    • " Is that what the abolish I.C.E. movement is about, is eliminating enforcement of our immigration laws and allow people who flout those laws to succeed in staying here in the United States in violation of those immigration laws? Of course, abolishing I.C.E. would mean ending all of the agencies' programs and functions. It would mean allowing dangerous criminals, including potential terrorists who are in our country to remain here. It would mean scrapping the I.C.E. Cyber Crime Center's investigation of child exploitation online."

McConnell

Opening Remarks

Jul 17 2018

Today -

  • The Senate will convene at 10:00 a.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #601, James G. Blew, of California, to be an Assistant Secretary of Education.
  • At 11:45 a.m., the Senate will VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #601, James G. Blew, of California, to be an Assistant Secretary of Education.
  • Following disposition of the Blew nomination, the pending cloture motions will ripen.
  • Following the cloture vote on the Quarles nomination, the Senate will recess until 2:15 p.m. to accommodate the weekly policy meetings.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 12, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #595, Randall Quarles, of Colorado, to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 12, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #892, Andrew S. Oldham, of Texas, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Fifth Circuit.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 12, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #903, Ryan Wesley Bounds, of Oregon, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Ninth Circuit.

 

Senator McConnell: (10:06 a.m.)

  • Spoke on new I.R.S. reporting rules.
    • "It's particularly welcomed news to those of us who intently are focused on defending the First Amendment, for those of us who over the years have raised concerns over the last administration about activist regulators punishing free speech and free association. It's a straightforward, commonsense policy decision. The Internal Revenue Service is cutting back on the amount of nonpublic information it collects and stockpiles about Americans who donate to nonprofit causes. The I.R.S. will no longer pointlessly demand private contribution lists from whole categories of tax-exempt organizations."
  • Spoke on Republican economic policy.
    • "There are plenty of ways to measure how American workers job creators and entrepreneurs are writing a new chapter. After nearly a decade of stagnating pay and vanishing opportunities, recent months have brought remarkable milestones. Optimism among American small businesses has reached its highest level since President Reagan's first term. 67% of Americans believe now is a good time to find a quality job in the U.S., the highest percentage in 17 years of Gallup polling."