Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018

Tuesday, September 4 -

  • The Senate will next convene for legislative business at 3:00 p.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #1061, Elad L. Roisman, of Maine, to be a member of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
  • At 5:30 p.m., the pending cloture motion will ripen.
  • Note: on Tuesday, August 28, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #1061, Elad L. Roisman, of Maine, to be a member of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Senator Grassley: (6:29 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "His grit and determination as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, he's legendary and ought to be an inspiration. For the rest of his life, he understood from his own experience what it takes to keep a country safe, and he stood up for the security of the United States and in turn that was standing up for the security of the world. He prioritized those in uniform and the veterans who he safeguard our nation. I had tremendous respect for Senator McCain's leadership of the Armed Services Committee and for the many ways that he led on a number-one responsibility of the federal government: our national defense. Senator McCain and I have served in the Senate together since 1986."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "The second strategy Democratic leaders pursued was the attempt to bury the Judiciary Committee in irrelevant paperwork, mountains of it. I have discussed the issue at length previously so I'll only give you a bottom line. The bottom line is that we have received more pages of documents from Judge Kavanaugh's time as an executive branch lawyer than we did from any previous Supreme Court nominee. In fact, we've already received over 430,000 pages of Judge Kavanaugh's executive branch legal records, which is nearly as many as the last five nominees combined."

 

Senator Sullivan: (6:50 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "There has been a lot said, especially from a freshman senator who hadn't served with John nearly as long as most in this august chamber. But if Senator John McCain taught us anything, it was to speak when you feel compelled to speak. And when it comes to him, I certainly feel compelled to speak. Particularly as a newer member of this body who thought the world of this man and learned so much from him. John McCain was a leader. There is no arguing about that. And one of the qualities of leadership that's so important and sometimes gets overlooked that was a huge quality of this great senator was his ability to focus on, give his time and willingness to mentor newer members of the Senate."

 

Senator Casey: (7:14 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "There's a line attributed to Abraham Lincoln where he said in the end, it's not the years in one's life that counts. It's the life in those years. It's a loose translation, not exact. But when you consider the life in those years in the context of John McCain, what a life it was. A remarkable human being who was able to rise above the horror of being a captive and being tortured to achieve so much in his life after that, in the Navy, as an elected official, and as a presidential candidate. And of course most especially as a leader. John McCain demonstrated a kind of courage that most people cannot even begin to imagine."

Hoeven, Tester, Sasse

Morning Business

Aug 28 2018

Senator Hoeven: (5:56 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "He fought fiercely for what he believed in. Everybody talks about how when he took a position, he took it - he took it with a passion. And so whenever you debated him or discussed things with him, when you worked with him, when you were on the same side, when you disagreed, he had that amazing passion that came through and many have remarked on it. It was a remarkable trait. It's part of that warrior in him. For the entirety of his life, John endlessly advocated for men and women in uniform. He served and he served them throughout his life in the senate. Working with him to support our service members and veterans is something that I will never forget. "

 

Senator Tester: (6:07 p.m.)

  • Spoke on healthcare reform.
    • "But if he could have been denied health insurance coverage because of a preexisting condition, my husband probably would not have received the care that he needs. Karen from Belgrade, Montana, wrote something similar, saying, I am very concerned about the Department of Justice's decision to no longer defend Americans against health insurance companies who want to disavow people with preexisting conditions - disavow people with preexisting conditions. I am a cancer survivor, as is my 22-year-old son. It is frightening to think that both of us may be uninsurable in the future if this trend continues."

 

Senator Sasse: (6:16 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "I knew John McCain as an American hero. But I didn't know John McCain the man. I didn't know John McCain, the flesh and blood, genuinely hilarious guy. But over the past 48 months I had the privilege of actually getting to become friends with John McCain. It's sort of weird to say when you're our age - you're a good bit older than I am, but when you're roughly our age, Mr. President, I'm 46 and John McCain was an octogenarian, and he befriended me. I've been on many overnights with John McCain, I've been to war Zones with John McCain. I've been cussed out by John McCain lots of times. He would call me stupid bastard on a regular basis and he meant it affectionately."

Barrasso, Schatz, Moran, Cardin

Morning Business

Aug 28 2018

Senator Barrasso: (5:18 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Known for his stubborn courage and his heroic patriotism. He leaves a legacy of devotion and love for his country and his family when I first came to the Senate, Mr. President, John was very welcoming. He knew I had been an orthopedic surgeon and told me to take a look at his x-rays. Of course the x-rays showed the many fractures as a result of being shot down over Hanoi and the subsequent beatings as a prisoner of war. It was out of pure generosity on his part that we became friends and traveling companions. John took great pride in this institution and in knowing that none of us in this body of 100, left or right, Republican or Democrat, conservative or liberal, none of us agreed with him 100% of the time, but every one of us respected him and the strength of his convictions."

 

Senator Schatz: (5:29 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "He was an early voice that warned about North Korea's nuclear program, and as a long-time member and chairman of the Armed Services Committee, he always stood up for our men and women in uniform. A few years ago on the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, my predecessor Daniel K. Inouye planned to give a floor speech remembering the 2,004 Americans who died that day. Senator Inouye's staff let it known he would mark the anniversary on the Senate floor but he gave that speech to a chamber that was not full. But John McCain was there. He was there for Senator Inouye just as he had been there for our military and for our country time after time."

 

Senator Moran: (5:35 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "I first met John McCain in 1996 in Hayes, Kansas, my hometown. Senator Bob Dole, then a candidate for president of the United States, would fly into the airport in Hayes near his hometown of Russell. This time he had a guest with him, John McCain, who was his campaign chairman in his presidential campaign. I watched the two of them interact and it's really the first time I had the opportunity to see a senator perhaps other than my own two from Kansas. Senator Dole had the greatest regard for Senator McCain. Senator Dole wore the P.O.W. bracelet never having known John McCain when he was a P.O.W. but by happenstance chose to wear a bracelet in honor of and respect for, being concerned about a P.O.W. in Vietnam."

 

Senator Cardin: (5:47 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Mr. President, I rise today to express great sadness for the passing of Senator John McCain. It marks a deep loss for this country, the state of Arizona, and above all his family and friends. John McCain was an honorable public servant who sacrificed greatly to serve his country in uniform and as a lawmaker proudly represented the people of Arizona. Mr. President, I will always remember the bipartisan luncheon that we had. When senator McCain recounted his experiences as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. There wasn't a dry eye in our caucus. In my visit to Vietnam, I had a chance to visit the Hanoi Hilton and see firsthand the place where John McCain acted so bravely. He was truly an American hero."

Vote Results (Confirmation)

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Confirmed, 69-26:

Executive Calendar #910, Richard Clarida, of Connecticut, to be Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

The vote results will be posted here within one hour.

McConnell (UC), Klobuchar, Portman, Brown, Blunt

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator McConnell: (3:08 a.m.)

  • Unanimous Consent –
    • That notwithstanding Rule XXII, the pending cloture motions with respect to Executive Calendar #911, Executive Calendar #783, and Executive Calendar #720 be withdrawn.
    • That at 3:45 today, the Senate VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #910, Executive Calendar #911, Executive Calendar #783, and Executive Calendar #720 in the order listed.
    • Further the pending cloture motions with respect to the following Executive Calendar numbers be withdrawn: 633, 635, 636, 674, 676, 692, 693, 731, 779, 782, 838, and 893.
    • Further, following disposition of the Patelunas nomination, the Senate VOTE on confirmation of the following nominations: Executive Calendar numbers 633, 635, 636, 674, 676, 692, 837.
    • Finally, at a time to be determined by the majority leader in consultation with the minority leader during the week of September 4th, the Senate VOTE on the following nominations: Executive Calendar numbers 693, 731, 778, 779, 782, 838, 839, 893.
    • (Without Objection)

 

Senator Klobuchar: (3:09 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "My heart goes out to his wife Cindy, his mom, his daughters, and family. In the Navy, John exemplified heroism and bravery and in the senate he was a mentor to so many of us. He taught us how to work with leaders on the world stage, but then he taught us something just as important, and that is how to work with each other when we're here back at home. This past month my husband and I got to visit John and Cindy at their ranch in Arizona for one last time. Even while battling brain cancer, he continued to be engaged in the issues of our time. He continued to have that signature McCain humor and that grit. My last memory of John, I had brought a few of his books with him, and he was getting tired, and he pointed to one sentence in one of the books, and he said to me, that, that's what matters."

 

Senator Portman: (3:21 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "It was my job to get under his skin and prepare him well for the debates, and I did it. Many of my colleagues will tell you he was a fighter and a tough competitor and did not mince words. I was on the other end of that after some spirited debates, I was glad in the real world I was on his side. Needless to say he was not happy to me. I think Cindy McCain didn't forgive me when I was playing the role of Senator Obama. Even two years later when I was first elected and joined him here in the United States Senate, he would introduce me to the reporters in the hall and say, that's the jerk that played Obama."

 

Senator Brown: (3:30 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Richard Clarida to be a member and Vice Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
    • "That's the way the Fed works to be on the board and then some special vice chair of supervision or vice chair generally in those titles that go along with the appointments. Federal Reserve hasn't had a full board since August 2013. Why is that? Well, president Obama nominated qualified financial experts Alan Landon, a small community bank owner, I believe, from Hawaii, and professor Katherine Dominguez who both stepped up to serve their country. They put a number of their lives' activities of hold in order to serve on the Federal Reserve. Yet the chairman of the Banking Committee, not the present chairman Senator Crapo, the former chairman of the Banking Committee simply refused to give a hearing to either of them."

 

Senator Blunt: (3:43 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Members of the media saw that. He was a man of intensity. He was a man who believed in his country. He was a man who believed that this country deserved to be represented well all over the world understand that freedom should be defended - and that freedom should be defended. Somebody observed to me earlier in the day that traveling with John McCain, he was unbelievably patient with the troops and unbelievably tough with the generals. And I've seen that and many of us have seen that."

Cassidy, Reed, Thune

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator Cassidy: (2:49 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "I speak of 2014 when I was running for senate for the first time and John McCain came to Louisiana to campaign on my behalf. And it was remark to believe see how veterans responded to him. And we would go - oh, my gosh, it was a sort of schedule that is legendary for John McCain. We started off in Covington, Louisiana, then went to New Orleans, and then went to Baton Rouge, to Lafayette, drove up to Shreveport and came back to New Orleans - all in one day. And others would have been tired. He was energized. He taught me about social media. Folks would come up to him and wish to have their picture taken. He was take a selfie and he would say, post it on Facebook."

 

Senator Reed: (2:53 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Those who knew him knew that above all else John was a loving father, devoted husband, and a dedicated family man. Today we mourn with the entire McCain family. I would like at this time just to take a few moments to reflect on his heroic legacy. When I think of John McCain, words come to mind - courage and sacrifice. As a son and grandson of decorated naval officers the desire to serve his country ran deep in John. Following in their footsteps, he graduated from the naval academy and went on to serve in Vietnam. The events that followed, being shot down, captured and held in horrific conditions have become military legend. His indomitable spirit carried him through his years of imprisonment. But his willingness to sacrifice for his fellow servicemen should be testament of his courage and sacrifice."

 

Senator Thune: (3:01 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "In 1968, his captors offered the malnourished and ill McCain the chance to be returned home early, ahead of prisoners who were next in line. John McCain said no. He spent another almost five years in captivity before being released on March 14, 1973. It scarcely needs to be said, Mr. President, that he remained a thorn in his captors' side the entire time. Mr. President, living in perhaps the most privileged country in the world, it's hard for most of us to imagine going without the internet for a few months, let alone something more fundamental like electricity or indoor plumbing. The courage and character and sheer determination required to undergo regular torture, malnourishment and deplorable living conditions is almost impossible to fathom."

Graham

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator Graham: (2:15 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "He had wanted to be president. He was prepared to be president. But it was not his to have. And I remember above all else the speech he gave that night. John taught us how to lose. When you go throughout the world, people remember his concession speech as much as anything else. There are so many countries where you can't afford to lose because they'll kill you. And John said that night, President Obama is now my president. So he healed the nation at a time he was hurt. I learned that serving a cause greater than yourself hurts. Anybody in the military can tell you the risk you take. He couldn't put his jacket on. He couldn't comb his hair because he got hurt serving a cause greater than himself. I remember how easy it is to say and how hard it is to do, how hard it is to tell your base I think you're wrong."

Hatch, Tillis

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator Hatch: (12:24 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "What is exceptional of John McCain is that he not only met the heavy expectations placed upon them, he far exceeded them. Few have ever risen to the position of influence that John McCain did. Fewer still have done so and kept their character intact. But Senator John McCain did. Indeed, he never parted from it. As a prisoner of war in Vietnam, John was offered release on multiple occasions, yet he refused each offer until the P.O.W.'s incarcerated before him were also released. Greater love has no man than this than a man lay down his life for his country, for his friends. John possessed such love providing time and again his willingness to lay down his life for his brothers in uniform."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "They've called him a reactionary. That's terrible. They've said his nomination threatens the destruction of the Constitution. Even more terrible. They've said that those who support his nomination are complicit and evil. Even more terrible. Next week the American people will have an opportunity to see Judge Kavanaugh. They'll find that he's not a reactionary. They'll find that he doesn't in fact intend to destroy the Constitution. And they'll also find that those who, like me, support his nomination are not complicit and evil. Rather, the American people will see a whip smart, incredibly accomplished, humble man."

 

Senator Tillis: (12:38 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Mr. President, before I speak on a topic that I sadly have to come to the floor every week and speak on, I want to offer my heartfelt condolences to the McCain family and to all of his friends and supporters. I had the privilege of serving on the Senate Armed Services Committee with Senator McCain for three years. I learned a lot from him and he has done a wonderful job of standing up for men and women in uniform and standing up for veterans in his entire time in Congress. I also wanted to share this one story. I had a reporter ask me yesterday, you know, what kind of experiences have you had with him that were most memorable. And it was a day that I spent with him in North Carolina back in 2014."
  • Spoke on Pastor Andrew Brunson.
    • "This man's name is Andrew Brunson. He's from Black Mountain, North Carolina. He's a Presbyterian minister and he spent the better part of 20 years in Turkey as a - in a Christian ministry. He opened a church just outside of Izmir several years ago. It's a very small church. They would have an open-door policy. Anyone could come in. And he had been living peacefully there for 20 years."

Cornyn, Nelson, Coons

Executive Session (Clarida Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator Cornyn: (11:39 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "He was a man who loved his country and was beloved in return. One of the things I appreciate the most about our friend Senator McCain is he truly believed in all his heart, in all his being, in all his soul in American exceptionalism and that America had to lead in the world. Because in the absence of American leadership, that void would be destabilizing and even dangerous. We know that John cast a long shadow in Congress over the last four decades of American politics, and we will continue to honor and remember him this week and into the future. But tears and sentimentality are not what he would want from us. Today instead we should try to remain a little more grateful than we otherwise would be."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "When approaching his mind-set, he said this a good judge has to keep learning, that they should constantly challenge themselves to study legal problems in greater depth, even when doing so force them to reconsider their instincts and prior inclinations. That is exactly the kind of justice the Supreme Court needs, one that's never content to rest on his laurels, one that's constantly educating and improving himself when it comes to the history of our country or the nuance and difficult technical aspects of the law. The truth is, since his nomination, Judge Kavanaugh has demonstrated that he is eminently qualified and well respected by all that know him and those that are familiar with his work."

 

Senator Nelson: (11:51 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "Mr. President, when you walk by Senator McCain's desk and you see the black drape in the bowl of - and the bowl of white roses, it really underscores the loss. We lost a colleague, we lost a friend, the country lost a true public servant. After the stories that you've heard of him being shot down of spending all of those years in the Hanoi Hilton, beaten nearly to death when he was fished out of the lake in downtown Hanoi, he continued to serve his country in the Navy, in Congress, in this Senate, and, of course, as the party's nominee for president. His call to serve, his sense of duty and honor is the legacy of John McCain. He's an example for all of us. He was a fighter and he was funny too."

 

Senator Coons: (12:09 p.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "John was convinced that what makes America great, what has always made America great is its values, its principles, that we stand for something in the world, not the example of our power but the power of our example. That only when we fight for those values, when we fight for the values that define us apart from other powerful nations, for human rights, for freedom of speech and religious expression, for the foundations of democracy as guarantors of liberty, only when we do that do we best use our power in the world. What impact did John McCain have on those of us here in the Senate and on our country? John commanded this chamber when he spoke like few others I have ever known, and he commanded it precisely because he called us to our better selves."

Durbin, Schumer

Executive Session (Johnson Nomination)

Aug 28 2018

Senator Durbin: (10:14 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "I've lost a friend. America owes John McCain, his family our gratitude and respect for his courage and sacrifice and for the trials he endured to serve the nation that he loved. John came into this world with big shoes to fill. His father and grandfather were four-star admirals in the United States Navy. John McCain met and exceeded his family legacy. I first met him 35 years ago. In 1982, we were brand-new freshmen congressmen elected to the U.S. House. I spotted him on the other side of the floor in the Senate and of course knew instantly who he was and worked up the courage to go over and introduce myself."

 

Senator Schumer: (10:29 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "His friendship, his service, his integrity, his career in the Senate. One of the ways to carry on his memory is for us to try to live up to the expectations he had for the senate, expectations he shared with us even in his waning days. To act with more humility, to ignore the critics, to put aside our differences when necessary, learn to trust each other more. In Senator McCain's memory, we can try to live by those principles and make the Senate a place where, despite the noisy din of politics, progress can still be made. That's a sentiment that I hope will long outlast the memorials, tributes, and observances this week."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Recently declaring some documents personal rather than presidential records, a determination that we have been given no basis for. Judiciary Republicans went even further in their efforts to conceal Judge Kavanaugh's record by labeling another small portion of those documents "Committee Confidential." So of the 6%, close to a third cannot be seen by anyone but members of the Judiciary Committee, and they can't talk about it to others. That's 4% of Kavanaugh's record being made public. And there is no guidelines, no rules as to which 4% is being made public and which 96% is being withheld."

McConnell

Opening Remarks

Aug 28 2018

Today -

  • The Senate will convene at 10:00 a.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #994, Lynn A. Johnson, of Colorado, to be an Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services.
  • At 10:40 a.m., the Senate will VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #994, Lynn A. Johnson, of Colorado, to be an Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services.
  • The Senate will recess from 12:30 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. to accommodate the weekly policy meetings.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #910, Richard Clarida, of Connecticut, to be Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #911, Richard Clarida, of Connecticut, to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #783, Joseph H. Hunt, of Maryland, to be an Assistant Attorney General.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #720, Isabel Marie Keenan Patelunas, of Pennsylvania, to be an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #633, Terry Fitzgerald Moorer, of Alabama, to be United States District Judge for the Southern District of Alabama.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #635, R. Stan Baker, of Georgia, to be United States District Judge for the Southern District of Georgia.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #636, Charles Barnes Goodwin, of Oklahoma, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Oklahoma.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #674, Barry W. Ashe, of Louisiana, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #676, James R. Sweeney II, of Indiana, to be United States District Judge for the Southern District of Indiana.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #692, Susan Paradise Baxter, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #693, Marilyn Jean Horan, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #731, William F. Jung, of Florida, to be United States District Judge for the Middle District of Florida.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #779, Dominic Lanza, of Arizona, to be United States District Judge for the District of Arizona.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #782, Charles J. Williams of Iowa, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Iowa.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #838, Robert R. Summerhays, of Louisiana, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Louisiana.
  • Note: on Wednesday, August 22, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #893, Alan D. Albright, of Texas, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Texas.

 

Senator McConnell: (10:05 a.m.)

  • Spoke in tribute to Sen. John McCain.
    • "I've also heard in recent days that perhaps Senator McCain's portrait should join that distinguished group. So it's a further tribute to our colleague that there's no shortage of good ideas. In order to make sure we realize these intention, I'd like to put together an official group that can elaborate and bring together ideas from current members, former colleagues, and friends. It will be bipartisan as only befits John's legacy, and come to think of it, would probably call it not a committee but a gang. So I'm glad we're able to form this gang to ensure that a suitable, lasting tribute becomes a reality. I'll have more details regarding this group to share in the coming days after our friend is laid to rest."
  • Spoke on Democrat obstruction.
    • "But as I've stated, the continuing historic obstruction from Democrats on the president's nominees continues to make our progress on that front insufficient. So we'll stay at it. Currently before us the nominees to be assistant secretary at the Department of Health and Human Services, a vice chairman for the Federal Reserve, important posts at the Departments of Justice and Treasury, and a slate of impressive nominees for the federal judiciary. I hope we can continue to make progress. It remains my intention to confirm all 17 of the nominees currently before us before the Senate concludes our business this week."
  • Spoke on Republican economic policy.
    • "U.S. workers get biggest pay increase in nearly a decade. Open jobs outnumber U.S. unemployed for a third straight month. But it's also important to look beyond the headlines and ask whether all Americans are benefiting if this new prosperity. For years under the last administration, much of the so-called recovery only touched some communities and some industries. Many vulnerable Americans fell further and farther behind. Today things are different. A growing vibrant economy has room for everyone. The unemployment rate for young Americans age 16 to 24 is now as low as it's been since July 1966. 1966."