Monday, Jul. 30, 2018

Tomorrow -

  • The Senate will convene at 10:00 a.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #1006, Britt Cagle Grant, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit, post-cloture.
  • At 12:15 p.m., the Senate will VOTE on the motion to concur in the House amendment to S. 1182, the NFIP extension.
  • Following disposition of the motion to concur, the Senate will recess until 2:15 p.m. to accommodate the weekly policy meetings.
  • At 2:15 p.m., the Senate will VOTE on confirmation of Executive Calendar #1006, Britt Cagle Grant, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit.
  • Following disposition of the Grant nomination, the Senate will VOTE on cloture on Shelby Amendment #3399 to H.R. 6147, the minibus appropriations bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on Shelby Amendment #3399 to H.R. 6147, the minibus appropriations bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on H.R. 6147, the minibus appropriations bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515, the NDAA.
  • Note: the cloture motion with respect to the motion to concur in the House amendment to S. 1182, the vehicle for the NFIP extension, has been withdrawn.

Cassidy, Casey, Perdue, Isakson

Executive Session (Grant Nomination)

Jul 30 2018

Senator Cassidy: (5:05 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the NFIP.
    • "So on Friday cloture vote was filed in the Senate on the four-month extension that the House passed. The problem is that the cloture vote will not occur until Wednesday, setting up the final passage of the extension on Thursday. It means the NFIP would lapse for two days. Now, it is totally avoidable. It does nothing to advance reforms within the NFIP, many of which I proposed a year ago in a long-term reauthorization bill introduced with colleagues from New York and West Virginia. The lapse does disrupt real estate transactions for the 2,600 Americans trying to close on their home, perhaps their first home, over the next couple of days."

 

Senator Casey: (5:09 p.m.)

  • Spoke on Medicaid.
    • "This is 53 years today, I should say - today marks 53 years since the Medicare and Medicaid programs were created, and I'll speak specifically today about Medicaid. Many Americans are familiar with all of the benefits that Medicaid provides to so many Americans, but I don't know if people have a sense of the scope of it. First of all, Medicaid helps 70 million individuals and families in every stage of life. Medicaid covers nearly half of every - every one of the births in the United States of America."

 

Senator Perdue: (5:18 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Britt Cagle Grant to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the 11th Circuit.
    • "Mr. President, this is a testament in my state. When that happens that means people on both sides of the aisle understand how she is applying the rule of law. It's a testament to the quality of her work, the dedication she has to the Constitution, and to the people for whom she works. Prior to her public service, Justice Grant argued a commercial litigation case before the highest court of the land, the United States Supreme Court. By the way, she won. Justice Grant attended Stanford Law School and after graduating, she actually clerked for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, another outstanding nominee that will be confirmed hopefully to the United States Supreme Court later this year. I might add that Judge Kavanaugh sat through Judge Grant's confirmation hearing in front of the Judiciary Committee just some few months ago."

 

Senator Isakson: (5:29 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Britt Cagle Grant to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the 11th Circuit.
    • "Thank you, Mr. President. I come briefly but quickly but proudly to recommend Britt Grant to this body and the United States of America as the next judge from the state of Georgia to be on the circuit court. Britt Grant is an outstanding jurist. She's on the Georgia Supreme Court at the age of 40. She went to Stanford University Law School, Wake Forest University undergraduate. After she left Stanford University, she came to clerk for Brett Kavanaugh who is nominated for United States Supreme Court. Throughout her legal career whether practicing as an attorney, whether serving as a judge or whatever she did, she was always at the top of her class, the top of her case or the top of her ability."

Schumer, Wicker, Blumenthal

Executive Session (Grant Nomination)

Jul 30 2018

Senator Schumer: (3:31 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "On Friday, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Chuck Grassley, sent a letter to the George W. Bush Library requesting only a small portion of Judge Kavanaugh's records. Traditional letters from the Senate Judiciary Committee requesting the letters of a Supreme Court nominee have been bipartisan and complete. When Democrats were in the majority, we joined with the Republican minority and requested all, not some, all of Elena Kagan's documents. When Democrats were in the minority we requested all of Sotomayor's documents. At Republicans' insistence, that included documents from 30 years ago when she served as a board member of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund because they had questions about her views on certain of those issues."
  • Spoke on the nomination of Britt Cagle Grant to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the 11th Circuit.
    • "She worked on a brief to the Supreme Court that defended a Georgia prosecutor's decision to strike black jurors on their race. She led Georgia's challenge to 
      DACA, even though 85% and 90% of Americans are for DACA. Before becoming Georgia's solicitor general, she argued against the Affordable Care Act, insisted on an amicus brief defending Indiana's defunding of Planned Parenthood, urged the Supreme Court to gut the Voting Rights Act, and argued to strike down the Affordable Care Act's contraception coverage mandate."

 

Senator Wicker: (4:42 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the NFIP.
    • "History does not provide the public with very much encouragement in the regard of actually getting some reforms done. They're going to keep it going with a patchwork. But out of 41 times that the National Flood Insurance Program has been reauthorized over the past 20 years, reforms have been included only three times out of 41. Not a great record, but I hope before the end of this calendar year we can add a fourth substantive change to make some progress. One thing I would hope we could do is to enact the changes to the coastal act in a bill that I have introduced called the Coastal Implementation Act."

 

Senator Blumenthal: (4:52 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
    • "Madam President, there are few responsibilities - I would say none more important than our duties in connection with the appointment of a United States Supreme Court justice. Much is at stake in the nomination that is before the Senate now to appoint Judge Brett Kavanaugh as the justice who will replace Justice Kennedy. So much is at stake. The future of Roe v. Wade, affordable health care, particularly preexisting conditions, and the protections of them for millions of Americans. But I'm not here to talk about Judge Kavanaugh as a nominee. I'm here to talk about how we reach a conclusion, how we vote. My colleagues and I. How we seek and pursue the truth about Judge Kavanaugh, his qualifications, his temperament, his integrity and intellect, who he is, and what kind of justice he will be."

McConnell

Opening Remarks

Jul 30 2018

Today -

  • The Senate will convene at 3:00 p.m.
  • Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #1006, Britt Cagle Grant, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit.
  • At 5:30 p.m., the pending cloture motions will ripen.
  • Note: the filing deadline for first degree amendments to the measures with pending cloture motions will be 4:00 p.m.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on Executive Calendar #1006, Britt Cagle Grant, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on Shelby Amendment #3399 to H.R. 6147, the minibus appropriations bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on H.R. 6147, the minibus appropriations bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on the motion to concur in the House amendment to S. 1182, the vehicle for the NFIP extension bill.
  • Note: on Thursday, July 26th, cloture was filed on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515, the NDAA.

 

Senator McConnell: (3:03 p.m.)

  • Spoke on the upcoming legislative schedule.
    • "Mr. President, we'll finish up a set of appropriations measures we've been considering for several days and take four more big steps toward our goal of completing a regular appropriations process and funding the government in a timely and orderly manner. We'll authorize vital resources for our nation's armed forces and we'll attend to several other priorities as well, including extension of flood insurance and sending the bipartisan farm bill to a conference with the House. But first later today the senate will vote to advance the nomination of Britt Grant, the president's selection to serve on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals."
  • Spoke on Republican economic policy.
    • "But as I pointed out, it's a mistake to view this growth and the new prosperity for American families that it entails primarily as an achievement of government. It's American workers, American job creators, and American entrepreneurs who grew our economy faster than 4% this quarter. We have driven the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits to its lowest level in over 48 years and created 3.7 million jobs since the 2016 election. We repatriated more than $300 billion from overseas in the first quarter of this year alone, according to the commerce department, bringing that money home to our country."